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Kristen Stewart is Interviewed by Patti Smith for Interview Magazine

Kristen Stewart is Interviewed by Patti Smith for Interview Magazine

Kristen Stewart’s new interview and photoshoot with Interview magazine was just released, and it’s a must-see/must-read because she was interviewed by her hero: writer and singer, Patti Smith. In the new interview Kristen chats with Patti about Sils Maria, her forthcoming sci-fi love story, Equals, writing poems, and even a little about Twilight.

I CAN’T, LIKE, PUT ON THE SHOW. I’M NOT A PERFORMER. AND IT’S HARD FOR PEOPLE TO ACCEPT A SERIOUS TONE FROM A KID WITHOUT THINKING THEY’RE SORT OF STUCK UP.
—KRISTEN STEWART

Kristen Stewart - Interview Magazine

I’M WRITING A POEM FOR THE WEDDING OF ONE OF MYBEST FRIENDS. AND THAT’S ODDLY TAKEN UP A LOT OF ME, RECENTLY. I’M TRYING TO DEVELOP A LITTLE MORE FAITH IN MY HAND, BECAUSE EVERYTHING THAT I DO IN TERMS OF PRODUCTIVITY IS ALWAYS REALLY CEREBRAL.
—KRISTEN STEWART

Kristen Stewart - Interview Magazine

I’M SITTING BACK AND ENJOYING THE BENEFITS OF A DECISION THAT I MADE WHEN I WAS A PERSON WHO I CAN STILL RELATE TO BUT AM NOT ANYMORE.
—KRISTEN STEWART

Kristen Stewart - Interview Magazine

SOMETHING HAPPENED TO ME AND I BECAME REALLY SUCCESSFUL AT SOMETHING AT A YOUNG AGE, AND THAT STUNTS YOU IN EVERY OTHER ASPECT OF YOUR LIFE BECAUSE YOU FEEL LIKE THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE GOOD AT AND SO THAT’S WHAT YOU NEED TO STAY IN.
—KRISTEN STEWART

Kristen Stewart - Interview Magazine

Kristen Stewart - Interview Magazine

Kristen Stewart - Interview Magazine

Kristen Stewart - Interview Magazine

Kristen Stewart - Interview Magazine

PATTI SMITH: Hey. Is this weird?

KRISTEN STEWART: It’s so, so weird. You’re going to do a proper interview, huh? That’s cool, I think.

SMITH: How old are you, 24? I just turned 68 and I was thinking about what I was doing at 24. I hadn’t recorded Horses yet. I was still working in a bookstore. I was doing performance, I was writing. But what you’ve already been through and accomplished professionally, it’s kind of amazing. Did you want to be an actress when you were a little girl? What were you thinking about then?

STEWART: Well, I’m sitting back and enjoying the benefits of a decision that I made when I was a person who I can still relate to but am not anymore. I think by default I wanted to be an actor because, on a movie set as a little kid, the only thing that you can do is be an actor. And I was really enthralled by the whole process. At that point I just really wanted to be on sets, going to a thousand different places, and work as hard as my parents work. Both my parents work in film. They’re crew. I love movies, and I just wanted to be involved. I got really lucky. I auditioned for a while and then started making films. I used to say that I always wanted to be the youngest director. But now I’m like, “No, I’m going to wait until I’m properly ready to do that.”

SMITH: When I was a kid, I used to dream about playing Jo in Little Women. Or I wanted to play Joan of Arc. It was daydreaming. We all daydream as children. You had the drive and were in a position where you could realize these dreams and projections. I don’t know if it was your first piece, but I remember the movie you did with Jodie Foster [Panic Room, 2002] when you were, like, 12 years old?

STEWART: Yeah, that was my second movie. It was a long process. I started it when I was 10, wrapped when I was 11, and it came out when I was 12.

SMITH: Wow, you were only 10. I saw some of the interview footage you did when you were probably about 12.

STEWART: Oh, dear.

SMITH: You’re so natural and straightforward. And throughout your films, your characters have that natural, straightforward way of being. Jodie Foster has some of that, and I was wondering if she influenced you as an actor at all, if you learned from her.

STEWART: I was really lucky to work with her at such a young age because I’ve had some serious self-persecuting … People sometimes actually get me to think I take things too seriously and maybe I’m too earnest and it’s coming across like I’m better than them. But working with people like Jodie—we are quite kindred. There’s just something when people look at you and go, “Listen, I know it’s awkward, but just keep being honest.” I could have gotten really unlucky and compared myself to another kind of actress and felt inadequate. I can’t, like, put on the show. I’m not a performer. And it’s hard for people to accept a serious tone from a kid without thinking they’re sort of stuck up.

SMITH: Also when you’re a loner type or a more straightforward type—I know from my own experience that people have always thought I was standoffish or not a team player. But it’s just that you have a trajectory. You know what you’re trying to do and you have to shed all of those things that people want you to drag around. You’re an actress and there are a lot of expectations, Hollywood expectations. But you seem to me not only an actor but a worker, involved in a lot of different disciplines, curious about other disciplines—writing, directing.

STEWART: That’s one thing I value most. I start to lose my mind if I’m not working on something, like breaking my back on something. It’s also very counterintuitive to boil down something so personal, something that requires privacy. All of a sudden, you open it up to the world and put it in a context where you could easily trivialize what you’ve done. If people sense that discomfort, they’re not wrong. It feels weird. It feels unnatural because, suddenly, on a dime, you turn around and go, “Okay, I’m going to let everyone into this!”

Head over to INTERVIEW Magazine to read this entire interview!